Wednesday, 27 August 2014

Trapped



Tonight, my heart paces
My head pounds
Like I downed a cup of coffee
I know what's right, but it's hard to do
Tomorrow is the day
                                   And I'm only ten min's away

I so wish it were
A moving melting mirage
That I couldn't reach or catch
But I'm here now, I dunno how
Did I pause praying?                 
                                   Or did I stop studying?

'Twas while working your vineyard
I got trapped in this love yarn
Am I at fault for falling over? After all 
I asked you take them butterflies away
Nay, King of kings
                                   You gave 'em extra wings

Now my mouth blinks
My eyes mutter
I stutter
Rehearsing my parting lines
Tomorrow must come, ain't no doubt
                                    I wanna do right. I want out!



©Radiant~ August 2014

Sunday, 24 August 2014

Chyking 201 (Three Case Studies)

Now this is what I've been talking about- A proper way of Chyking'.
If you've been following this blog, you probably would have come across my two articles - Chyking 101 and 102. If you have not, I kindly suggest that you scheme through them for a better appreciation of what I'm about to write.

Chyking, a word from Nigerian parlance, is the art of chatting up a lady in order to get into a closer relationship with her. It also refers to what we call 'to toast a girl'. It simply means to woo a girl. 

From my experience, I have concluded that many Nigerian guys have an approach that puts women like me off rather than attract them. I've also discovered the missing key. For me, it's politeness. Just some manner of courtesy. That's all. I'm not promising I'll let out my number but at least I'll give an ear to a polite guy. 

So after much disappointment with guys, I came across one who I'm sure hasn't read my blog but has the proper approach I discussed.

Yesterday, I was walking down to church and heard someone call me from the back. I can't  remember exactly what he said but it certainly wasn't a hiss because I turned to him, though in my heart I was like 'here comes one of them'. He didn't start by asking for my name- thank goodness. He just said 'you're beautiful', which was allowed. I mean, it is allowed to make your observation and voice your opinion. Even I, do it sometimes. So I thanked him. He then asked where I was heading to and I told him that I was going to church.

In order not to bore you with the details of the conversation-though it was quite an interesting one, basically, he didn't go the typical way that I frown against. In fact, it didn't even look to me like he was chyking me. He probably was just admiring what he saw. I remember him saying 'I'm sure that you would be getting a lot of 'distraction' on the road, I'm probably one of them'. I found that funny. Well, we just talked about what we did and then he said his name, shaking hands with me (yeah, you heard that right, SHAKING HANDS WITH ME and I didn't use a hand sanitizer afterwards), he added 'it was nice to meet you' and then began to leave. It was I who said, 'maybe you could check me on Facebook' and he came back asking if I was on BB. He then gave me his number, so I could text my pin to him. Well, if that was his own strategized method, it sure worked and still left him much respected too. 

Now, I don't remember his name, I hardly do when it comes to road chykers, but I'm sure to scroll through my phone contacts to get his number, even if it is to make him read this article. I'd really like to commend his manner of approach.  

To give you a clearer picture of what I'm saying, just ten minutes later in church, the guy next to me suddenly leaned towards me muttering some words. I had to strain my ears and ask him to repeat his lines until I deciphered that he was asking if I were a student of Yabatech. Okay, before you fall off your seat in horror, actually, the program I attended was a students' summit, so the question wasn't that tangential, though I didn't get the Yabatech part because there were several schools from Lagos to Ogun State being represented.

First, I burst his bubble by replying that I was not a student. Apologetically, he said 'oh sorry, I thought you were from Yabatech. There are many of them here'. Cool. So I'm not. What next? He seemed to recline a bit thinking of what next to say. Then he suddenly got a spark and said 'can we meet more than this?' I didn't really get that so I made him repeat the lines and heard the same thing. So I figured out what he was saying and you can guess what my response was. Of course it was a capital 'No' and I have no apologies for that. 

Interestingly, one would have thought that I'd be more favorable towards the one I met in church, sitting next to me, than the one I met on the road, but you see how the different methods made the difference. It wasn't really a factor of how they looked or spoke English, though these are very important factors for a good communication, or was it in the societal class. It was the politeness of approach. Now, I'm not advocating stopping ladies on the road to chat them up. I personally have a grudge against that. But like I said, the earlier guy's approach was commendable.

That very same day, after the program, I entered a public bus and was seated next to a man whom I hardly noticed until he began to cough. In this era of the deadly E, when someone coughs in a 'bus', you can guess the reaction of people. So I guess he suddenly got the point and just went straight to the point. 'You are beautiful' -the same opening lines with the first guy. 'Thank you', I replied like you expected.
'Are you just coming from the east?' (Now this is one of them)
'No'
'So you've been in Lagos for sometime'
'Yes'
'Are you going to Ikeja or Maryland?'
'Maryland'
(If this were a job interview, I wouldn't mind)
'Can I have your number?'
'No'
'If you don't mind'
'I mind'
'Ok, lemme give you mine'
I'd begun to get irritated.
He sensed it and left me for a while. I answered a phone call that told me to no longer stop at Maryland, but at the last bus stop at Ikeja. So we reached Maryland and the bus stopped for passengers to alight. He came down thinking I was hot on his heels. Then seeing me still seated, he decided to pee by the road. Luckily for him, there was a traffic jam, so he wasn't left behind.
He came back to the bus after voiding and continued.
'So are you from Onitsha or Asaba?'
'None'
'Or Arochukwu'
'No'
'Where are you from?'
By this time I was pretty much pissed.
Turning to him, I asked 'Why do you want to know where I'm from?
He noticed my tone and knew better not to answer that question , so he sat up and alighted at the next bus stop.

And did I mention that he had a ring on his fourth left finger, all that while?

I certainly don't need to analyze this one. Let's not over flog this issue. I hope you've gotten my point. You judge for yourself what approach is best.

A word is enough for the wise!

©Radiant~ August 2014
click here for Chyking 202

Friday, 8 August 2014

Salt Water Or No Salt Water (How To Prevent Ebola Virus Infection )


Today, I was awakened by a call from my mom who wanted to find out about the relationship between Ebola virus and salt water solution. She had been harassed by calls and text messages just this morning about how bathing with salt water will prevent Ebola virus. One of the calls was by 3am. The other said a prophet prophesied that bathing with salt water without soap will prevent it. How ridiculous!

Some say is a biological war that Americans are using against Africans. That seeing the emerging economy of Africa, Americans released Ebola, that has been in existence for quite some years into Africa, so that Africa will seek World Bank aid, borrow money and be in debt. Now World Bank recently pledged a loan of 200 million dollars to a few African countries for the prevention of Ebola and we are now in debt.

While people are dying, others because of the same thing are becoming wealthy. Broadcasts and text messages are flying everywhere. People are blogging.
Fear grips the hearts of men. People are no longer going to work for fear of contracting Ebola. People are wearing 'protective' clothes looking like those that work in a microbiology lab. But for how long? 

Has any one asked, 'where has SARS gone to?' What about Bird Flu that destabilized a lot of farmers' incomes?

People are looking for answers. 

So how can we prevent Ebola?

The other day, they said the answer was Bitter Kola. Now the Aboki man has sold out all his Bitter Kola but the epidemic still persists. And now the Salt Water theory came along, and common salt is also about to go extinct.  

Folks, the only definite answer lies in Jesus Christ. Anyone that hasn't acknowledged Him is doomed, not just in eternity but even in this life. But Christians should be aware of what they have in Christ because we will likewise perish if we keep fearing what they fear. All these are signs of the ends of time. Yea I know quite well that I sound like a broken record because you've been hearing that since you were born. But that's why we should live our lives ready for Christ's return because no one knows the day. You heard that there will be wars and rumors of wars, pestilences and famine. The current Ebola epidemic is what the Bible calls pestilence. So what should we do?

First of all, every one that is not in Christ should run to God for safety, and that, literally. If you are in Christ, stop shaking like a leaf and start confessing the Word of God about your safety. Even if your body has refused to stop shaking, don't stop your confession (I'll tell you how I did that in my diary narration of the armed robbery attack to my compound).

Therefore, look for what God has said about how he will protect His people and keep confessing. The following Scriptures (in English Standard Version unless otherwise stated) are some of the confessions I've discovered. To confess over your life, just change the second person pronouns to first person. E.g 'you' to 'me' or 'I'.

Psalm 91:1-3  He who dwells in the shelter of the Most High will abide in the shadow of the Almighty.  I will say to the LORD, “My refuge and my fortress, my God, in whom I trust.”  For he will deliver you from the snare of the fowler and from the deadly pestilence. (You see, God has promised to deliver us from Ebola virus).

Psalm 121:7-8  The LORD will keep you from all evil; he will keep your life. 8 The LORD will keep your going out and your coming in from this time forth and forevermore. (For those that have refused to leave their houses)

Isaiah 54:17  no weapon that is fashioned against you shall succeed, and you shall refute every tongue that rises against you in judgment. This is the heritage of the servants of the LORD and their vindication from me, declares the LORD.” (For those that say it's a biological weapon of warfare by the Americans)

Col 3:3b Your life is hidden with Christ in God

Ps 27:1 (NLT) The Lord is my light and my salvation- so why should I be afraid? The Lord is my fortress, protecting me from danger, so why should I tremble?

Ps 112:7 (NLT) They (talking about they that fear The Lord and delight in obeying His commandments) do not fear bad news; they confidently trust The Lord to care for them.

Yes there are reasons to be afraid. People are dying but Jesus says 'Be of good cheer, I have overcome the world'. Therefore, keep confessing and keep believing.

This is how to prevent Ebola.

Not exactly what you expected, right?

©Radiant~August 2014

Half Of A Yellow Sun Movie- my review

Okay, now I need to talk.

I've seen a few movie reviews lately. Kind of interesting how people have so varied opinions about the same stuff. Not surprising though since we don't wear the same shirt.
Anyway, I went to the movies today. Ozone Cinema at Sabo, Yaba, Lagos, Nigeria. Do I also need to tell you it's in West Africa? I hope not. 
I saw the popular movie, 'Half Of A Yellow Sun'. 
Hmmmm (sighs), how do I begin this?

Okay, generally I think it's eh........m,  starting with the good side, I was impressed. Really. I looked out for a foolery in the costume and props and setting, you know, since it was dated back to the 60's. They pulled it off pretty well. I loved the fact that the hair styles and the dresses were old school and the cars.... I was really tripped to see right hand drive cars. It showed they were thinking. That's unlike what you see in typical Nollywood movies; not to bad-mouth anybody, but I think Nollywood directors should understand that viewers have working brains.
Back to the movie, yea, I was also impressed with the war scenes, the gun fires, bombings, they were pretty real. I couldn't believe I was seeing a Nigerian movie. Well, not like it was a Nollywood movie though.
Kudos to Onyeka Onwenu. She was just perfect for her role. I loved her acting.

But I didn't start out enjoying the movie. I was just going through the motions till the war scenes began.
And why was that?
First, I personally think that a Nigerian would have best suited the lead role. It was hard to convince me that Olanna was Nigerian, even though they said she schooled in London. No matter how long you school abroad, you should be able to pronounce at least your own name correctly. So in that case I wasn't impressed.
Secondly, I just didn't get why she had to be shown nude and then severally for that matter.
Then the sex scenes.... (shaking head) the details weren't necessary.

Being a Christian I detected a lot of wrong values being portrayed by the movie and if care is not taken, people will imbibe these as the norm.
Things like Olanna and Kainene making decisions to leave home and just informing their parents during the last supper. Kainene meeting a white man with his date in a party and she flirts about him. He leaves his date and starts seeing her, then finally marries her.
Olanna moving into the house of her boyfriend and having sex with him before marriage. Odenigbo using 'being drunk' as an excuse for sleeping with Amara and Olanna's aunt saying of Odenigbo that he just did what 'all' men do. By this they are unconsciously or maybe even consciously, you never can tell, putting it to men that infidelity is part of their genes.
Then, Olanna retaliating by sleeping with her sister's boyfriend and telling Odenigbo after he just made out with her. Such a web of licentiousness.

Yes I understand that these things are what really happen in life, but we have to make it clear also that they are wrong and have repercussions, if not the society will be formed by the values we present via media, while media will keep presenting those values as real life and it just becomes a vicious cycle. Media has a power of influence. Christians called into media should use it for good because we will be judged.

Then there was a long delay with the casting before the movie started (typical of Nollywood) and 'directed by ' appeared 3 times before the movie. Looked like the director was advertising himself. Don't know, just saying.

In conclusion, if you've not seen it, maybe you should. But don't have your hopes high because I might just have been more disappointed if I had read the novel before seeing the movie- most movies adapted from novels are less interesting than their novels. 
Also, please don't go with children or teenagers and guard your heart with all diligence. We come across so much wrong stuff daily that we just have to learn, as followers of Christ to take in the juice and spit out the gum.
(Heaves a sigh of relief), now I have quite well spoken.

©Radiant~ August 2014