Sunday, 17 March 2019

My UK Driving Practical Test Experience


My driving practical lessons started in October last year. It cost £31/hr. I had almost 20 lessons of 2 hrs each. I only just passed this month after 2 failed attempts in between.

The first time I knew I had failed. It was on a dual carriage way. I had been told the route to take but discovered late that I was to be on the right hand lane and I was almost approaching the roundabout. So I started indicating right to join the right lane. There was a van coming in full speed, not budging. I panicked that I was almost at the roundabout and thought if I started making way into the lane he would slow down for me. That was when my examiner did an emergency stop. The car would have crashed in on me, had he not stopped me. So I wasn't surprised to hear after the test, "unfortunately, you have not passed this time". I still cried though, being my lachrymose self.

The second one took me by surprise. I thought I was good. The examiner avoided the dual carriage way which made things easy. I went through the narrow country roads on national speed limit. I thought to myself, "this examiner is really taking it easy on me. We even had some small talk, asking about my work and if I had to go back to work that day. I thought I had done well, until I heard the bombshell. "Unfortunately... (At first I thought, why unfortunately? maybe she wants to scare me like in Who Wants To Be a Millionaire where they tell you, 'I'm sorry but that was the right answer' so as to get you to cringe initially). But this wasn't Who Wants to Be A Millionaire. "Unfortunately, you did not pass this time". I couldn't believe it. She took me round the easiest route. We even chatted. How could it be? What did I do wrong? Well, apparently, early on in the test, say 5 mins into my independent driving, I had run on 40 mph on a road with a limit of 30 mph. That was where my test ended. The rest was just to pass time. No wonder she took me through an easy route. And the small talk? Maybe she didn't want me to see her as wicked. This time I didn't cry. I was too shocked to cry. I was dumbfounded. It was very painful though. Maybe tears clouded my eyes, but I doubt they dropped.

As fate would have it, my instructor told me she could no longer take me. Reason being she was no longer going to be teaching Automatic but solely Manual. So she passed me on to someone else. At first, I felt rejected. I couldn't believe the excuse. I thought, maybe my failures were not good for her resume. But guess what? That change was exactly what I needed.

It wasn't easy. My first lesson with the new instructor was spent understanding the new car and getting used to the hypersensitive brakes. I had very short time to my next test. I was having to unlearn some methods and imbibing new methods. For example, when it came to roundabouts having 3 lanes on approach. My first instructor had taught me to always use the right hand lane when going to the 3rd exit. Which meant after the 2nd exit, I had to move into the middle lane in order to go into the 3rd exit and be on the left hand lane. My new instructor would rather I approached the roundabout in the middle lane and continue on that lane into the 3rd exit. I also had to learn new maneuver techniques and reference points. For forward bay parking, one used side mirrors for reference, the other used the inner door handle. After two lessons with the new guy, I was afraid I wouldn't pass again. I started thinking of swapping the date, except that it was too late. 

The D-day came. The same lady examiner who failed me in my 2nd test was going to examine me. This time, I made sure to avoid any chitchat. I refused to smile too much. We are here for business, I thought. We passed through a route I had rehearsed with my instructor just that morning and another I did the night before. I failed my "Show me" question because although I knew how to wash my back windscreen in the previous car I used, I had no time to learn that with this new car. My bay parking maneuver wasn't perfect. At least I was in the bay, even though too much to the right. I had no clues to whether i had passsed. I could only hope I passed. Glad was I when I heard her say, "Congratulations. You've passed the test." Surprisingly, I wasn't so excited. My instructor was even happier than I was, saying, "we did it, Chidiogo". All I could do was smile and praise God in my heart. I just needed to pass this time.

My advice to you if you are just starting out learning to drive is this:

1. You need a teacher that will make you better and ensure you pass your test not the one that will make you feel good about yourself.

2. You need a teacher that will tell you the truth as it is, if it means telling you. "You are not ready for this test, you need at least 6 more hours".  Not the one that will say, "I think you are okay. Just a couple more lessons you will be good".

3. You need a teacher that cannot overlook your flaws. One that stops you right there, points it out, corrects it and makes sure you get it right before proceeding to something else. Not the one that will simply say, "be careful next time".

I wish you luck as you learn. Please tell me your experiences in the comment section below. Ciao

Radiant ~ March 2019

Saturday, 9 March 2019

Why You Need a 9-to-5 - my personal experience




I hated Medicine. I wanted to follow my creative passion. I wanted to write songs, record songs, blog, dance, draw, anything but hold the stethoscope. I'd rather be making people laugh than making them well. I'd rather be in the midst of happiness than devouring people's aches and sadness. And I did. I explored all those. I took a break from Medicine after my national youth service year in Nigeria. But I was broke and frustrated. So I took up a job as a doctor.

Talking about bills. How are you to pursue your dreams when you have debt looming over your head? How can you be creative when you are on an involuntary fast? Even though I hated Medicine, I needed my job to at least afford me a roof over my head, at least two meals a day and transport fare to all the entertainment events I attended in Lagos in pursuit of my dream. From my medical career, I could pay to record 4 songs (and studio sessions aren't cheap). 

My attitude towards work changed when I came to the UK for a Masters degree. Then I had to survive, passion didn't cut it. I needed to be willing to take any job. Anything to pay my bills. So I got a job as a catering assistant at the university serving students, doing dishes. We did 2 to 4 hr shifts a day, about 5 days a week.  It was there I learnt that a business succeeds by discipline. Work gets done whether people feel like it or not because there are customers to satisfy. Success happens when you are able to meet your clients' demands always and in time. Without that discipline, you have no clients. 

I love to write. But if I didn't feel like writing, I wouldn't write. If I didn't feel inspired, I'd sit back and so my passion never really grew because of lack of discipline. I am still struggling to apply this discipline to my writing passion. Many times I have failed to meet up with scheduled blogs because I am my own boss in this regard. This is why I ain't earning millions from it yet. Those that turned their passion to successful businesses applied discipline. They weren't just having fun doing what they love to do. They got up when they did not want to get up because they had to meet demands. If you know you are lazy or let's say a little laid back, please take up a regular job.

Thanks to the many experiences I've had working 9-to-5, whether as a catering assistant or a doctor, I have got valuable insights that can be transferred to my creative endeavours. There are many valuable transferable skills you can pick up from other jobs to apply to your business. You don't want to miss out on those.

Now nothing written here is cast in stone. There are some that never had to work for anyone, started a business and are successful, but this is not the case for the majority. This two-part article is to get you to consider the pros to putting in your application while honing your skills in that dream of yours. The aim is to give your dream a chance. Dreams get frustrated when reality hits hard. Passion is not enough.

Radiant ~ March 2019
PS: you can still find a job that affords you enough time to hone those skills.


Do you like this blog post, your comments below are most appreciated and feel free to share with your friends. Did you miss the first part, click here to read.

Why You Need a 9-to-5 job


Okay you may not exactly start at 9am and finish at 5pm, you may start at 8 and finish at 6 or get out at 5am and come home at 10pm (the typical Lagos life), but you get what I mean - a regular job working Mondays to Fridays or working shifts including nights or weekends. Basically, I want to tell you why you need to be an employee. 

The rave is on entrepreneurship. "Be your own boss". "Follow your passion". Good thing is you don't have to answer to anyone. You can get up when you want and snooze the alarm at your own will or don't even have an alarm at all. While there is nothing wrong with starting a business immediately after school, there is also nothing wrong with getting a "9 to 5" as it is called. Here is why.

1. You need discipline. 
C'mon who doesn't love sleep and movies and food and play but hey, the world is sustained because people are working. Some people made the bed you sleep on, someone's work was to make the movies you are entertained by. Someone made that food and another designed that game. You have to contribute your quota. Except you are really self-driven, you need a boss to whom you are accountable and deadlines to get work done in a timely manner.

2. You need the money
Being an entrepreneur is not easy. Many people had a job they left to "follow their dreams". It turns out dreams don't pay well if at all initially. Except you can live off someone else during the sowing season of that dream, you need the job that gets you by. 

3. You need experience
You see young people running off to start a business without any experience of the corporate world or how to get customers or how the market works. Then they make mistakes, the business folds, they learn from one or two or three failed attempts before they make it big. Some failures would have been avoided if only they learnt from working under someone else. A regular job saves you from that risk. Moreover, you prove you know what you are talking about by your records. How do you gain customers when you have no experience to show? 

Click here to read my personal story or too lazy to click? Just continue reading.


I hated Medicine. I wanted to follow my creative passion. I wanted to write songs, record songs, blog, dance, draw, anything but hold the stethoscope. I'd rather be making people laugh than making them well. I'd rather be in the midst of happiness than devouring people's aches and sadness. And I did. I explored all those. I took a break from Medicine after my national youth service year in Nigeria. But I was broke and frustrated. So I took up a job as a doctor.


Talking about bills. How are you to pursue your dreams when you have debt looming over your head? How can you be creative when you are on an involuntary fast? Even though I hated Medicine, I needed my job to at least afford me a roof over my head, at least two meals a day and transport fare to all the entertainment events I attended in Lagos in pursuit of my dream. From my medical career, I could pay to record 4 songs (and studio sessions aren't cheap). 

My attitude towards work changed when I came to the UK for a Masters degree. Then I had to survive, passion didn't cut it. I needed to be willing to take any job. Anything to pay my bills. So I got a job as a catering assistant at the university serving students, doing dishes. We did 2 to 4 hr shifts a day, about 5 days a week.  It was there I learnt that a business succeeds by discipline. Work gets done whether people feel like it or not because there are customers to satisfy. Success happens when you are able to meet your clients' demands always and in time. Without that discipline, you have no clients. 


I love to write. But if I didn't feel like writing, I wouldn't write. If I didn't feel inspired, I'd sit back and so my passion never really grew because of lack of discipline. I am still struggling to apply this discipline to my writing passion. Many times I have failed to meet up with scheduled blogs because I am my own boss in this regard. This is why I ain't earning millions from it yet. Those that turned their passion to successful businesses applied discipline. They weren't just having fun doing what they love to do. They got up when they did not want to get up because they had to meet demands. If you know you are lazy or let's say a little laid back, please take up a regular job.

Thanks to the many experiences I've had working 9-to-5, whether as a catering assistant or a doctor, I have got valuable insights that can be transferred to my creative endeavours. There are many valuable transferable skills you can pick up from other jobs to apply to your business. You don't want to miss out on those.

Now nothing written here is cast in stone. There are some that never had to work for anyone, started a business and are successful, but this is not the case for the majority. This two-part article is to get you to consider the pros to putting in your application while honing your skills in that dream of yours. The aim is to give your dream a chance. Dreams get frustrated when reality hits hard. Passion is not enough.

Radiant ~ March 2019
PS: you can still find a job that affords you enough time to hone those skills.


Do you agree? Do you disagree? I would love to hear your thoughts below.